Facing Lava

Imagine you own a home, a pretty little place in the rural, forested area of the Big Island of Hawaii.

The same area hit hard last month by Hurricane Iselle!

The same area hit hard last month by Hurricane Iselle!

Now imagine that day after day and hour after hour, a stream of molten rock creeps ever so slowly, but ever so relentlessly, towards your home.

There’s nothing you can do but watch as liquid stone bubbles and smokes along the cracks in the forest floor, inching nearer and nearer.

(Video from Honolulu Star Advertiser by USGS)

You live in Kaohe Homesteads, a small neighborhood that stands in font of a lava stream that emerged from the Pu’u O’o vent of the volcano Kilauea.

Pu'u O'o vent on Kilauea. A very active volcanic site.

Pu’u O’o vent on Kilauea. (Credit: UH Hilo)

This is the origin point of the flow, Kilauea, about three days ago. (Credit: avaxnews.net)

This is the origin point of the flow, about three days ago. (Credit: avaxnews.net)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The vent is ten miles uphill from you but the flow has traveled 9.3 miles and it’s moving at 460 yards each day. It started on June 27th. The progress is unrelenting as the lava seeks the sea.

The U.S. Geological Survey says Kilauea is the youngest volcano on Hawaii Island but youth is relative – Kilauea’s first eruption happened between 300,000 and 600,000 years ago. In any event, this is no time for trivia. The fact is that Kilauea is very active and has been erupting since 1983. The name “Kilauea” means “spewing” or “spreading widely.” This time it may spread to your front door.

Pu'u O'o getting its freak on during a previous eruption.

Pu’u O’o getting its freak on during a previous eruption.

Kaohe Homesteads is in the Puna District of Hawaii Island. This  is a lush, agricultural district where papaya is a major crop.  It is on the edge of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve, Hawaii’s largest remaining lowland wet forest.

It seems that you can’t catch a break. Just a few weeks ago Tropical Storm Iselle made landfall here, toppling trees onto homes and disrupting utilities.

Lava on the surface burning through trees along the route.

Lava on the surface burning through trees along the route.

The bubbling magma is about 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit (~1,100 degrees Celsius). It burns and melts whatever it touches.

It may soon cut off the road that provides access to your neighborhood. The State and County officials hold meetings every few days but the news is uniformly tough to hear – there’s simply nothing anyone can do to halt the flow.

So far there have been no evacuations. This is not an explosive caldera eruption of the kind that makes the nightly news. No spurts of flaming red goop blasting into the area. This is a slow creep, predictable as to speed if not exactly as to route.

Community plan to provide refuge for animals.

Community plan to provide refuge for animals.

In the meantime, your friends and neighbors have been told to get their livestock rounded up and out of the area, just in case.

Some ask if the flow might be diverted but that’s a sensitive subject here. Kilauea is home to Pele, the Hawaiian volcano goddess. A significant number of your neighbors feel that it’s culturally insensitive to interfere with Pele’s will.

So you go home from the meeting smelling the sulfurous by products of the eruption, seeing the smoke plumes rise up not too far away.

If you’re one of the prepared ones, you’ve been packed up for weeks; otherwise, you’re packing right now.

Lava emerges from a new vent in the volcano Kilauea. (Photo credit: Associated Press)

Lava emerges from a new vent in the volcano Kilauea. (Photo credit: Associated Press)

Either way, within the next few days you may have to leave home and wait for a miracle, a chance of fate or the sight of your home bursting into a ball of flames as the melted rock touches it.

It’s possible that disaster will be averted. It all depends on subtle changes in the topography. The odds are looking rather long right now.

Another side of life in Hawaii for some folks. Send a kind thought their way.

Posted in Max's Stories, Random Stuff | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Max Visits Point Panic

Today Max, the Alpha Japanese Female (AJF) and I went to “Point Panic” on the eastern tip of Kaka’ako Waterfront Park, facing Diamond Head and Waikiki Beach across Mamala Bay.

Point Panic is where I took the banner photo at the top of this blog.

Point Panic looking east to Diamond Head and Waikiki.

Point Panic looking east to Diamond Head and Waikiki.

Point Panic got its name because surfers riding the left and right breaking waves have to carefully time their exit from the wave to avoid crashing against the boulders that make up the sea wall.

Depending on ocean conditions, the pucker factor can be significant. It’s game of aquatic chicken except the rock jetty never flinches.

Unusually high surf for the area. Not for neophytes.

Unusually high surf for the area. Not for neophytes.

Point Panic was memorialized in the Sufaris‘ 1963 eponymous tune. As with other Surfaris music, including the famous song “Wipeout,” this instrumental features an intro with maniacal laughter and a lead guitar with so much reverb it drips on the floor and stains your feet.

(If you didn’t click the Wipeout link above, by all means do so now and watch the whole video – it’s a throwback, sexist hoot full of bad surfing and worse dancing by the most homogeneous beach crowd ever assembled. A little goes a long way.)

Meanwhile, the video to the Point Panic song reminds us that we owe a debt of gratitude to MTV, VH-1, YouTube and others who advanced the art of videos.

Don’t let the first 10 seconds fool you into thinking that this video is interesting. It’s not.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HmfxWN07sww

The waves at Point Panic derive from an exposed reef break that has reasonably consistent surf. Point Panic usually offers small swells but on occasion will get bigger sets and, rarely, monsters.

Max likes this area but is convinced that direct exposure to sunlight will cause him to explode.

Max likes this area but is convinced that direct exposure to sunlight will cause him to explode.

As with most south shore/south swell breaks on Oahu, summer offers the best conditions for surfing.

Offshore winds blow from the northeast and if the trades are pumping the waves deteriorate in form but on a calm day the hollows and small barrels can be great fun and sometimes “epic” as the whippersnappers  say. Now, get off my lawn.

Here’s a short video of body surfing Point Panic on a pretty good day. Forget the Surfaris and enjoy the nahenahe background music and check out the sweet ride of a guy with a hand board at the 1 minute 30 second mark:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMvFJlr9tvo

Point Panic can be a challenge for beginners in bodysurfing. You need to have a good kick and strong stroke to accelerate in the water and out pace the hard core guys there. You also need excellent timing – it’s easy to miscalculate and get left behind. But the most important element (and most difficult to achieve) is to have the experience and relationships with fellow water folk to position yourself in the perfect spot.

Max's idea of going for a walk when the pavement is hot.

Max’s idea of going for a walk when the pavement is hot.

Legally, Point Panic is for body surfers only but it’s not unusual to see a mix of body, paipo and board surfing across the area with the body surfers on the left break and board guys on the right.

The atmosphere tends to be mellower than at other congested surf spots perhaps because there are a lot of older guys among the regular crowd.

It’s always been a place for the “Uncles” to show their old school body surfing talents

Turtles are regularly spotted in the area and occasionally sharks but I don’t know of any recent problems with ocean life.

Waiting for the next set as a charter fishing boat returns to the harbor.

Waiting for the next set as a charter fishing boat returns to the harbor.

Point Panic is just one piece of Kaka’ako Waterfront Park, a local destination and attraction that is not typically on a visitor’s itinerary.

While close to Waikiki and Ala Moana Center, this park is not visible from the streets in the area and frankly suffers because of its reputation – justly – as a place with a high density of homeless folks.

Kaka'ako Waterfront Park is rare open ocean front land in urban Honolulu. (Photo: SOEST, UH)

Kaka’ako Waterfront Park is rare open ocean front land in urban Honolulu. (Photo: SOEST, UH)

Unlike it’s famous neighbor Ala Moana Beach Park, this is not the easiest place to love. It takes a little while to appreciate the charms of the area, and they are many, but it is a place where the park’s potential may out weigh its present offerings. Here’s how it all started:

In 1948, the City and County of Honolulu constructed a large landfill directly on the shoreline’s shallow reef in order to get rid of material that they couldn’t burn. The ocean side of the landfill was defined by large seawall that measured 10 feet high and 30 feet wide at its base.

Max and the Alpha Japanese Female (AJF) on the promenade.

Max and the Alpha Japanese Female (AJF) on the promenade.

The landfill added 29 new acres of land to the Kaka’ako shoreline. The landfill was in operation until the 1960s. In the early 1990s the area was recovered , cleared, and filled-in for public use as the Kaka’ako Waterfront Park.

The park provides trails for walking a dog or jogging.

The park provides trails for walking a dog or jogging.

The names of the surf breaks offshore from Kaka’ako Waterfront Park serve as reminders of the park’s history.

True to local tradition of honoring descriptive accuracy over high falutin’ marketing brands, one of the surf breaks is named “Incinerators” because of its proximity to the site of the former trash burning facility and the other is named “Flies,” for the obvious reason.

The promenade, seawall and access stairs.

The promenade, seawall and access stairs.

The shoreline here lacks a sandy beach. There is only the seawall along the water’s edge and large boulders.

Entry to the ocean is from the rocks or by way of a couple of stairways that descend from the promenade to the water.

Park activities include body surfing, paipo, board surfing, and shore fishing. It’s an interesting area for night SCUBA diving, too.

The park is adjacent to Kewalo Basin Harbor, a mixed-use harbor that provides berthing for charter, commercial fishing and recreational vessels. Watching the cruise, parasail, charter fishing, SCUBA and speed boats from the promenade at the harbor mouth is always enjoyable.

Bring on the snacks and drinks!

Bring on the snacks and drinks!

The adjacent grassy areas and pavilions accommodate family gatherings and picnics and there are observation areas, an amphitheater that hosts diverse music acts, and a children’s discovery center.

The park offers some spectacular views of Diamond Head and is popular among photographers seeking fabulous sunset pictures, too.

"As the ship sinks in the west and the sun sails from the shore..." - old joke.

Sunsets at Kaka’ako Waterfront Park are famous.

There are two memorials in the park: The Ehime Maru Memorial and the Victim Memorial.

The Ehime Maru was a Japanese fisheries training vessel that was sunk in a controversial accident with the U.S. Navy Submarine Greenville on February 9, 2001 about 9 miles south of Oahu.

The nuclear submarine was demonstrating a “breech maneuver” that starts with a rapid ascent and literally launches the front of the boat into the air.

Sadly, the sub came up directly below the Ehime Maru killing nine crewmembers and students. The Victim Memorial is dedicated to victims and survivors of drunken driving accidents and was sponsored by Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD).

A sad reminder of a terrible accident offshore from the park.

A sad reminder of a terrible accident offshore from the park. The Ehime Maru Memorial.

The future of Kaka’ako Waterfront Park is currently a topic of hot debate.

In recent years, the University of Hawaii established a cancer research center and medical school in the vicinity.

Plans are afoot to make the park economically self sustaining by introducing a variety of cultural, civic and commercial activities.

Adjacent land areas have been marked for a possible Obama Presidential Center, cultural and commercial developments by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, sport and entertainment venues, community centers and maybe residential units.

The planning for this rare piece of ocean promenade and park lands draws lots of attention from those who would like the area left untouched, those who envision extensive development and everyone in-between. In a way, this debate and tussle over the future of Kaka’ako Waterfront Park is a reflection of what is happening across Oahu and the State as a whole. So much opportunity. So much responsibility.

Max back at home and ready for a brief nap. He' kind of furry right now - gets a haircut in 3 days.

Max back at home and ready for a brief nap. He’s kind of furry right now – he is due for a haircut in 3 days.

Of course, Max doesn’t much care about environmental impact studies or petitions or planning charettes.

For the small white dog, Kaka’ako Waterfront Park is simply green grass and play areas and fascinating sniffs of seafood so fresh it’s walking along the seawall rocks and might pinch an unwary dog’s nose.

For the Pupsicle, this is just a wonderful place to spend a couple of fun hours in beautiful Hawaii.

A Point Panic that we can all handle!

A Point Panic that we can all handle!

Oh, if all this outdoor sun, fun and surf talk has worked up a thirst, I recommend you quaff a Point Panic Pale Ale from Honolulu Beerworks.

I know that as I get older,  I head for the Point Panic beer more frequently than the Point Panic rocks. Cheers!

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

Kiku Update

Good news! Max’s favorite little Yorkie companion enjoyed great success at her first dog show.

This ;little weiner is a big winner! Congratulations to Kiku-chan.

Congratulations to Kiku-chan!

Here are the results in Kiku’s Mom’s own words:

On August 16 and 17, she won Winners Bitch (bitch is a good word in dog-ese) over her older “sister” and another girl, for 2 points each day, resulting in 4 points toward her goal of winning 15 points to become an AKC champion.

I’m glad she included that part about “bitch” being a good word among the dog set as my experience with that noun (and verb for that matter) has been less than stellar.

Apparently to many, I am the son of one.  On the admittedly rare occasion that the word has slipped twixt my lips it has inevitably resulted in my being judged a contumely oaf. Oh well, I’ll stop bitching about it.

Congratulations to Kiku-chan and good luck in her future competitions!

Posted in Max's Stories | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Doggie Photo App

Have you seen the new app called “BarkCam?”

Now here is an example of technology at its finest. BarkCam is an iPhone app that, according to a story in the LA Times, “helps people take pictures of mischievous dogs who’d rather frolic around than pose for a picture.”

The Times story goes on to say, “Before the photo is snapped, the app emits one of several sounds that should get a dog’s ears to perk up and pay attention in the right direction. Meows and squeaky toy sounds are other options.”

This sounds great! Max is a master at turning his head just as a photo is snapped. He delights in being photogenic until the moment of truth when he suddenly has to look away, lick his butt or start scratching his ear.

Perhaps they have a sound of a can of dog food being opened, a cookie treat being snapped into pieces or a burger sizzling on the grill, all of which are sounds that would attract the Malt’s attention.

Their website is funny. It has testimonials like the ones shown below:

With product endorsements like these, how can you resist buying this app?

With product endorsements like these, how can you resist buying this app?

There are also dog photos to which you can attach mustaches, glasses, a pipe and other accessories. Who says we waste time on the internet? It’s not all cat pictures and porn, dontcha know?

You know you want to play with this. Admit it.

You know you want to play with this. Admit it.

The website admits a fondness for “self-defecating humor” that you do not need to take on walkies. For example, they have a blog section with stories like: “Everything You Need To Know About the Beyonce & Jay-Z Rumors as Told By Puppies” accompanied with completely unrelated videos that ask questions like “Should Shar-Peis Consider Botox?”

Dog literally ROTFLMAO.

Full disclosure: I don’t get squat from these guys but if their business zooms because of this post I’m willing to negotiate. I can make up some ads for the condo elevators.

 

Posted in Max's Stories | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 19 Comments

Kiku

This is Kiku.

She loves to perch on the lower ledge of the refrigerator.

She loves to perch on the lower ledge of the refrigerator.

Ever since she was small – well, smaller since she is only 4 pounds now – she has loved to jump into the refrigerator if the door is left open for more than a few seconds.

Maybe she likes the cool air. Maybe she’s scoping out the salami.

Kiku’s a refrigerator girl but certainly not a chilly dog.

In fact, Kiku is a very high class canine, the debutante of our dog friendly residence.

She’s about 9 months old.

Her sire is an AKC Grand Champion; her dam is an AKC Champion. She’s pure pedigree puppy and a very pretty Pupperoni.

Alliteration is the blogger’s friend.

Kiku means “chrysanthemum” in Japanese. It’s one of those hard to spell words that wins big in Scrabble and produces a high mortality rate in Hangman and otherwise overworks your spell checker. Large numbers of otherwise brilliant kids from India lost their first spelling bee because of that word.

Note the stylized chrysanthemum on the Japanese passport.

Note the stylized chrysanthemum on the Japanese passport.

In Japan, the chrysanthemum is a symbol that represents longevity and rejuvenation.

For Japanese the chrysanthemum is to Autumn what the cherry blossom is to Spring.

When first introduced to Japan during the Nara period (710 – 793 AC), the Japanese Royal Family was fascinated with the Chrysanthemum.

Over time the Chrysanthemum became the Imperial Family’s emblem and the Chrysanthemum Throne is still the name given to the position of the Japanese Emperor.

In 1946, American anthropologist Ruth Benedict wrote a controversial book called “The Chrysanthemum and the Sword: Patterns of Japanese Culture” which was influential in shaping American ideas about Japanese culture and the behavior of Japanese in World War II.

The book focused on perceived contradictions in the Japanese culture which most Americans at the time considered incomprehensible. The author described the Japanese as…

“both aggressive and unaggressive, both militaristic and aesthetic, both insolent and polite, rigid and adaptable, submissive and resentful of being pushed around, loyal and treacherous, brave and timid, conservative and hospitable to new ways…”

After so many years as the AJF’s spouse-in-training I can confirm the accuracy of the above description, but I digress. This is a dog blog not Anthropology 202.

Tiny with a big personality and an impeccable pedigree.

Tiny, with a big personality and an impeccable pedigree.

Kiku is not Japanese. She is, of course, a Yorkshire Terrier, a breed developed in the 19th century in the county of Yorkshire, England.

But wait! Both of Kiku’s parents came from Italy.

In other words, Kiku is a purebred English Yorkie, born of Italian parents with a Japanese name. She is, therefore, a perfect fit for Hawaii where we dearly love a taste of chop suey.

Kiku loves to jump on boxes and snuggle into tight spots like under her owner’s desk.

She shares her happy home with two other Yorkies, both of whom are already accomplished stars in the world of dog shows.

This weekend Kiku will be entered into her first formal show.

It’s quite the production involving a top professional handler and we all have high hopes for Kiku’s career as a show dog. Max doesn’t care about her career, he just thinks Kiku scores high on the cute meter.

A favorite hiding spot - under her owner's desk.

A favorite hiding spot – under her owner’s desk.

Of course, Max is a show dog too. If you want him to obey, you have to show him some food. Snorf, snorf.

Posted in Max's Stories | Tagged , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

Insensitive Lout

Sometimes I’m just an insensitive lout. Other times I’m worse.

The Puna District took a hard hit from the hurricane.

The Puna District took a hard hit from the hurricane.

Recently I was crowing about how Honolulu lucked out on Hurricane Iselle and declared the storm as little more than an inconvenience.

I completely failed to note that some of my fellow Hawaii residents took a real beat down and are still suffering mightily from the effects of last week. Shame on me.

On the southeast coast of the Big Island is the Puna district, one of nine such districts on the Big Island, an area of some 320,000 acres which makes it just a tad smaller than the island of Kauai.

In Hawaiian, “puna” refers to bubbling fresh water and in the Puna district there are several tide pools where cold or hot spring water percolates from the ground.

The Ahalanui Hot Pond at Pu'ala'a County Park in Puna, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

The Ahalanui Hot Pond at Pu’ala’a County Park in Puna, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

It’s an extraordinary area with the highest volcanic risk on the island, with Hawaii Volcanoes National Park as a main draw, and extensive networks of subterranean lava caves.

Puna is not a wealthy area. In fact, approximately 85 percent of Hawaii Island’s Section 8 low-income rental housing certificate holders are Puna residents.

Puna is a unique ecological and geological environment with profound cultural traditions. It is the home of of the goddess Pele, giving the nearby volcano Kilauea and its surroundings a sacred status. Ancient Hawaiians recognized that human habitation here was subject to Pele’s will.

Pahoa town in the Puna District. A strange mix of old west and old Hawaii with a touch of Forever 1960 thrown in.

Pahoa town in the Puna District. A strange mix of old west and old Hawaii with a touch of Forever 1960 thrown in. Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Close to 50,000 folks live in the district. Due to Hurricane Iselle about 8,000 have been without water, power, ice or ready access to food supplies for almost a week and the prognosis is for a slow recovery because of extensive downed trees and limited resources for infrastructure repair.

So while I was happily crowing about dodged bullets, a lot of folks are toughing out a difficult period.

For that I feel badly – pedio-oral inversion on my part – foot in mouth.

E kala mai…I apologize.

At our condo association meeting last night we agreed to conduct a food and bottled water drive for the folks on the Big Island in connection with the Hawaii Foodbank.

Our “Aid for Puna” drive kicked off this morning and I was drafted to market the program so, of course, I will inflict a sampling of my efforts on you kind readers.

Here are a couple of our posters.

The dog looks familiar.

The dog looks familiar.

The first one features none other than the Malt who beseeches us to give so that he doesn’t have to beg. 

This is proof that there is little truth in advertising.

The FuzzButt doesn’t beg; he demands and, as a money player, will not sit and stay unless bribed with food treats.

We expect a good response to our food drive. Not only because our residents are amazingly generous – and they really are! – but also because we all stock piled supplies in anticipation of a strong storm and now need to clear out some space in our tiny domiciles.

I have a couple of cases of bottled water in the trunk of my car and hot sun plus an enclosed trunk does not improve the flavor of the water over time so I’ll donate that as a starter.

Puna Cat

Back to the ads. We tossed in a few Pity Cats to tug at the heart strings. Kittens are always good for food drives.

No, not as food, I meant as symbols of need to get folks to move from “Awww” to “Give”.

As a dog guy I am immune to Pity Cat marketing but, hey, whatever works.

Finally we used our best shot, an ad that was voted best in show at our previous Food Drive. The thing is, this one will be largely incomprehensible to folks not very familiar with Hawaii because it draws on a famous saying that embodies the Tao of Pidgin English.

“If can, can, If no can, no can.”

If can, can. If no can, no can. Kinda, sorta but not really exactly if you know what I mean.

If can, can. If no can, no can. Kinda, sorta but not really exactly if you know what I mean.

To us in Hawaii that pretty well says it all. Faced with a seemingly insurmountable challenge? Invoke the Tao of Pidgin. Reluctant to dive in but don’t want to refuse a request? Yep, works there, too. The closest comparable expression may be the Arabic “Inshallah” but our version lacks any religious connotations.

Aid for Puna

Again, e kala mai, my humble apologies, to my fellow residents in Puna and anywhere else who have have faced adversity from the hurricane.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Dog Day Afternoon

The Malt was itching for an excursion. He was tired of being cooped up because of hurricane and tropical storm warnings.

Run, Maxie! Run like the wind.

Run, Maxie! Run like the wind.

The Alpha Japanese Female (AJF) and I decided to indulge the whims of the small white dog and take him on an excursion to his favorite places.

We started with a trip to Maxie’s Park where the Furball got a chance to stretch his legs and run over the broad lawn areas.

Max spots the AJF in the distance. He knows that treats are available.

Max spots the AJF in the distance. He knows that treats are available.

Maltese have a funny “skipping” style when they run as if they are unsure whether to walk, trot or charge ahead full speed.

A brief pause on a park bench gave him the opportunity to catch his breath.

I made the sign of the horns above his head. He didn't seem to care.

I made the sign of the horns above his head. He didn’t seem to care.

Then, it was back to streaking around the park, a high speed Maltese Fuzzbutt all the way!

Our next stop was Puowaina, (“Hill of Sacrifice”) more commonly known as “Punchbowl Crater,” the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, a very solemn place, beautiful, silent, heavy on the mind.

This is a solemn place, a place of heroes.

This is a solemn place, a place of heroes.

Puowaina’s first known use was as an altar where Hawaiians offered human sacrifices to pagan gods and killed violators of the many taboos.

Later, during the reign of Kamehameha the Great, a battery of two cannons was mounted at the rim of the crater to salute distinguished arrivals and signify important occasions.

On the fringes of Puowaina we stopped to gaze at the skyline of urban Honolulu. Such a gorgeous day!

Max and the AJF overlooking our urban Honolulu home.

Max and the AJF overlooking our urban Honolulu home.

All that activity worked up an appetite so we headed to the harbor and Gordon Biersch.

The beer special was a Heller Bock, a very well balanced and tasty brew in the style first brewed in the 14th century by German brewers in the Hanseatic town of Einbeck. But I digress.

Max lounged on his chair and accepted the fawning of nearby diners and drinkers. We slipped him morsels of the filet mignon sliders.

Lunch! Max got some of the filet mignon sliders.

Lunch! Max got some of the filet mignon sliders.

We munched and chatted. The afternoon cruises returned to port. We ordered another brew and some fries to be eaten with ketchup and loads of Tabasco, of course.

The mood was laid back, relaxed and friendly. It was an excellent spot to while away some time.

So well behaved! He perches on the chair very quietly.

So well behaved! He perches on the chair very quietly.

Finally, we left the port and headed home. A quick stop for the Malt to relieve himself and it’s back at the condo.

Well fed, lots of grins from jokes, good conversation, french fry theft strategies and dog scratches.

A very happy little Pupsicle.

Posted in Max's Stories | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments